Narrows Park

All parks are open 7 am to dusk


This park offers stunning views of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge and is considered one of the peninsula’s best-kept secrets. It features several picturesque viewing areas, a small creek, and picnic shelter.


Park Description

This 34.26-acre property has 1,315 feet of sandy-rock beach that face the Narrows Passage with excellent views of the Narrows Bridge and Tacoma. The 6.0-acre waterfront area has a paved parking area, grassy play, and picnic area, picnic tables, a non-motorized boat launch, telescopes, and a gazebo overlook.

Please visit the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife for the latest, seasonal updates on fishing regulations.

Part of the Cascadia Marine Trail System

This park is one of PenMet Parks’ waterfront sites for use with non-motorized watercraft by the Washington Water Trails Association (WWTA). Specifically, Tacoma DeMolay Sandspit is one of three of the PenMet Parks within the Cascadia Marine Trail, also including Tacoma DeMolay Sandspit Nature Preserve and Sunrise Beach Park.

Park Features

General

Dogs on leash

Picnic

Picnic areas with tables

Sports

Boating, fishing

Buildings & Venues

Picnic shelter, portable restrooms on site

Natural Features

Wildlife, creek

Additional

Whale watching, ADA-accessible viewing area

History

Narrows Park’s 36 acres include mature forest, and 1,315 feet of saltwater beach, and is the result of the combination of several parcels owned by several different families over the years.

In 1889, Section 33, including Narrows Park, was owned by W.S. Ladd. In 1915, the north portion of Narrows Park was owned by J.A. Hosher. In 1924, N.M. Lawson owned the southern portion after it served as part of a U.S. Military Reservation. In 1951, Doc Weathers owned a 36-acre parcel in the south portion, and built the main residence in 1961. He also owned several hundred surrounding acres including the site of the Tacoma Narrows Airport.

Doc Weathers’ wife, Lucille, inherited the 36-acre parcel in 1985 from his estate. Fred and Grace Gemmel inherited the property in 1992 from Lucille’s estate. In 1994, the Gemmels gifted the property to the Lutheran Church Foundation in St Louis, Missouri. The Trust for Public Land acquired the property from the Lutheran Church Foundation in 1996 in anticipation of selling it to Pierce County.

Pierce County acquired the property in 1996 for $2.5 million through the use of Pierce County Conservation Futures funds and a Washington State IAC (later RCO) federal Land and Water Conservation Fund grant. The road, parking, and viewing areas were developed in 2005 as a component of the third Tacoma Narrows Bridge construction.

In 2011, Pierce County transferred the property to the Peninsula Metropolitan Park District which now owns, operates, and maintains the park. Eagle Scout projects have added picnic tables and other amenities.

Park Rules

Download Park Use Regulations (PDF)
Download Leash Regulations (PDF)

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